Harnessing the Power of Innate Immuno-Oncology.

An exciting new effort to fight cancer in a more effective way.

Current efforts to beat cancer are trying to do it with one hand behind their back. At Stingray, we are unleashing the full immune system to take this fight to an entirely new level.

Immunity has two major arms and current therapies invoke only one of them.

Current Therapies:
CAR-T and Checkpoint Inhibitors

The best, current immune-oncology therapies are in adaptive immunity. They modify T-cells (CAR-T) or block adaptive immunity suppressive proteins (PD-1, PD-L1 – so called checkpoints) through checkpoint inhibitors. These therapies have made great strides, but resistance is increasing and many tumors do not respond to these therapies.

Our Target: ENPP1

Cancer secretes immune suppressive proteins that provide it stealth-like capability against the human immune system – the half that launches defensive T-cells and antibodies (adaptive immunity) we are treating today.

This is why checkpoint inhibitors have been a revolutionary approach to fighting cancer. However, cancer develops resistance to checkpoint inhibitors, so using them alone is like fighting with one hand behind your back.

The second half of the immune system is the innate immunity built into every cell – the surveilling for cancer and foreign DNA/RNA which alerts adaptive immunity to the site of the problem and the first responder immunity that inflames the cell so adaptive immunity knows where to attack and so interferon and inflammation can fight the cancer. But cancer secretes another protein — called ENPP1 — that blocks innate immunity and stops this important process.

Defeating ENPP1 is our goal. And it’s a revolutionary new approach that enables the full, two-fisted immune system to stop cancer. This is our approach to taking immune oncology to the next revolution for patients.

"Defeating ENPP1 is our goal. And it’s a revolutionary new approach that enables the full, two-fisted immune system to stop cancer."
Jon Northrup
CEO